Health Disparities

The topic of health disparities is exhaustive. Every inequality in any aspect related to health is part of health disparities. This includes examples like: higher prevalence of diseases in certain ethnic groups, limited access to healthcare by those of a lower socioeconomic status, malaria existing in developing countries, but being almost non-existent in developed countries, whether a person has access to healthy food based on the neighborhood they live in. The examples are endless. Awareness is a huge part of reducing and eliminating disparities. After all, you can’t do much about something that the general population doesn’t know exists or doesn’t find an issue with.

I think that infographics are a great way to catch a person’s eye and inform them at the same time. They are a fun (or profound) way of drawing attention and awareness to important topics. Below are two examples of infographics that are related to health disparities/health topics.

If you click on the pictures it will take you to the original link where you can zoom in to view it in greater detail.

From: Center for American Progress website. Article: Cuts to Community Health Centers Harm Communities of Color the Most.

From: Institute of Medicine of the National Academies

I would also like to share a resource that I found when doing some research on health disparity initiatives for my Theory of Health Behavior class. It is an initiative and research program called Global HealthShare (GHS) initiative and is through the Center of Excellence for Nutritional Genomics at the University of California at Davis. They are focusing on eliminating disparities between developing and developed countries and try to make all improvements as sustainable, affordable, and environmentally friendly as possible. I suggest taking a look at their website and the current programs they are working on, they are really great.

Click the picture below to visit their site:

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s